Yes (Official Thread)

StreamingTodd4545

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I'm not a huge fan of 70's Yes (pretty much only like Roundabout and I've Seen All Good People), but 80's and 90's Yes? Where do I begin?

Trevor Rabin is such an amazing guitar player (and a good singer to boot) that he brought that band to a whole new level. Of the 4 CD's he did with Yes, 90125 is clearly the best, but Lonely Heart is actually the weakest cut on that CD. Changes is the best track and there's this band called junXion that does an excellent cover of that song.
 

Ar-Pharazon

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I'm not a huge fan of 70's Yes (pretty much only like Roundabout and I've Seen All Good People), but 80's and 90's Yes? Where do I begin?

Trevor Rabin is such an amazing guitar player (and a good singer to boot) that he brought that band to a whole new level. Of the 4 CD's he did with Yes, 90125 is clearly the best, but Lonely Heart is actually the weakest cut on that CD. Changes is the best track and there's this band called junXion that does an excellent cover of that song.
I've never understood what "progressive" means for bands, there seems to be multiple definitions. But bands like Yes and Rush "progressed" by adapting to the 80's and 90's so well they never missed a beat. Genesis too as far as the 80's, though they were more pure 80's pop then.
 

Riff Raff

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I've never understood what "progressive" means for bands, there seems to be multiple definitions. But bands like Yes and Rush "progressed" by adapting to the 80's and 90's so well they never missed a beat. Genesis too as far as the 80's, though they were more pure 80's pop then.
For me progressive for bands are bands who include complex musical techniques, song structures, transitions, use of atmospheres throughout as their main style of writing.
 

Ar-Pharazon

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For me progressive for bands are bands who include complex musical techniques, song structures, transitions, use of atmospheres throughout as their main style of writing.

Does that define Rush? Lucifer's Friend was called progressive, and they seemed only to change styles from album to album ("progressing"?) A great band, but maybe I don't understand what is "complex".
 

E-Z

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The definition of 'progressive rock' has probably changed quite a bit from the rock bands that were popular in the UK and Europe during the early 1970s that were called progressive rock bands with bands like Deep Purple, Focus & Emerson, Lake & Palmer those three bands incorporated classical influences and inflections within the rock format of the day although Deep Purple went more straight ahead heavy rock as the decade progressed and even went into a funkier rock style on Stormbringer & Come Taste The Band albums. The bands that are called 'Prog Rock' are usually bands that don't really interest me much I am more into heavy or blues/rock bands from the 1970s.
 
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Ar-Pharazon

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Early Genesis was often referred to as "art rock", but generally gets included in the "prog" list.
 

Riff Raff

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Does that define Rush? Lucifer's Friend was called progressive, and they seemed only to change styles from album to album ("progressing"?) A great band, but maybe I don't understand what is "complex".
I think it defines Rush especially their albums with longer pieces and albums after the 80s.
 

Riff Raff

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The definition of 'progressive rock' has probably changed quite a bit from the rock bands that were popular in the UK and Europe during the early 1970s that were called progressive rock bands with bands like Deep Purple, Focus & Emerson, Lake & Palmer those three bands incorporated classical influences and inflections within the rock format of the day although Deep Purple went more straight ahead heavy rock as the decade progressed and even went into a funkier rock style on Stormbringer & Come Taste The Band albums. The bands that are called 'Prog Rock' are usually bands that don't really interest me much I am more into heavy or blues/rock bands from the 1970s.
I can agree the meaning has changed a bit over time especially once progressive metal started taking hold.
 

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