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George Thorogood Bourbon Scotch Beer Lyric Help

Discussion in '70's Music' started by dwf15010, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. dwf15010

    dwf15010 Junior Member

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    My buddy and I are going round and round arguing about the first line of GT&D's Bourbon Scotch and Beer. If you google the lyrics you'll find "Wanna tell you a story about the house MAN blues" and "Wanna tell you a story about the house RENT blues." He says its one. I say it's the other. Which is it?
     
  2. Cadleson

    Cadleson Unfortunate Son

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    I always thought it was the house RENT blues. On the studio version I think that's what he says, at least.

    Thorogood may switch it up when live, or something. You never know...
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  3. rtbuck

    rtbuck Senior Member

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    Definitely House Rent Blues which I think that part of the song is actually called House Rent Blues by I believe John Lee Hooker plus the lyrics are about not being able to pay the rent...One Bourbon One Scotch One Beer was originally recorded by Amos Milburn but wrote by someone else & John Lee Hooker also covered it in the 60's
     
  4. BikerDude

    BikerDude Senior Member

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    It's a bit of hot potato really
    The Amos Millburn version was the first recorded version and the lyrics are completely different from the GT lyrics and the John Lee Hooker version. Basically all three are completely different.

    Here's the Amos Millburn lyrics vs the John Lee Hooker version

    One scotch, one bourbon, one beer - Amos Milburn

    This sort of thing was not uncommon in the blues. Most black artists didn't expect to record any of their songs and often songs would have different version depending on who the performer was. Often the original is lost to various other artists versions
     
  5. Minlinks1

    Minlinks1 Senior Member

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    Very interesting thanks
     

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