Punk Rock History

Astrid Kirchherr65

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I agree VU were not Punk just they were an important part and influence on the formation of Punk in NYC. Flower piece, which I've never read before, makes a great point I wasn't even aware of.

Yes, I agree with you on all points.

VU ,was a catalyst of punk rock..they were the after Glam-Gliiter before the Punk..some of the ideals lyrics wise (as Mr Bowie suggests in Flowers' piece above) were the forefront of punk music style.

They SHOULD be noted in this respect..I think we're all in agreement here..

Thank you for pointing it out Ak.

And thank you Flower for helping define it as 'Art Rock' with your article..:grinthumb
 

Astrid Kirchherr65

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Nothing wrong with that that's why I said on an earlier post that everyone can write there own story on Punk & how it got started & it would be different from everybody elses yet have similarities. I know my Punk story would be a little different so I try not to find fault with anyone elses writings. The only reason I opened up about the VU was because Eberg said "I personally don't see the direct influence VU had on punk.." & I just wanted to point out that what I had read about them in various media I've read over the years including that recent book I've mentioned, helped me understand that scene & how they fit. You summed it up perfect though by saying "I'm not a music critic..I'm just a fan". That's all I am... I've just always been obsessive when it comes to music where I love to dig up info on the stuff I love.

Maybe we should start another thread titled "Your history of Punk!" I'd love to read everyone's version.
:cheers2:cheers2:cheers2

It's all good friend:cheers2

Yes I'm quite sure it's something Punk fans would define according to their exposure to Punk Music

Music critics and music books are usually full of factual information. Things like Wikipedia attempt to condense data and define subjects for quick easy access/reference.

Books such as the ones we both mentioned usually have mixtures of fact and personal information ,usually based on first hand knowledge of the subjects/bands/music.

I still think tho as I think we agree..music is about feeling and expression. Especially punk music. It's good to have the experts help define and put labels on things but I feel music is such a subjective venue..it really can't be about critics opinions.

it's what draws you in..the beat ..the lyrics...the look ...the attitude..

 

troggy

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They were Americanized version of Glam and Glitter rock

Nah, the VU were around at least as early as 1966. They were an obvious huge influence on the Modern Lovers. You also have to remember the early punk scene in New York was broad enough to include acts like Patti Smith and Blondie.
 

Flower

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Nah, the VU were around at least as early as 1966. They were an obvious huge influence on the Modern Lovers. You also have to remember the early punk scene in New York was broad enough to include acts like Patti Smith and Blondie.

True .. Here is a nice little write up that I found on Amazon ..

New York group the Velvet Underground are the most seminal band in alternative rock music. Famously, while their debut album was a commercial flop, it has been said that the few people who bought it were all inspired to start a band. That album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967), is now widely considered to be one of the most important albums in the history of rock music. The Velvet Underground were managed by renowned pop-artist Andy Warhol, who designed the now-iconic 'peeling banana' cover for the album, and insisted his German model protégé Nico was to sing on three songs. Her unique, deep voice and Lou Reed's deadpan vocals discussed taboo themes over John Cale's droning viola and deliberately detuned guitars, for a distinctive VU sound that pre-empted various strands of alternative rock by at least a decade.

Their second album, White Light/White Heat (1968), was even more experimental, for example featuring a 17-minute distorted guitar jam called "Sister Ray". Their third album, named simply The Velvet Underground (1969), marked a noticeable change in direction after Cale was replaced by Doug Yule. With hushed acoustic-led ballads, and only one experimental track, it was their most accessible album yet. In 1970, they released Loaded, so called because it was supposed to be 'loaded with hits'. It wasn't -- it was yet another commercial flop -- but the 3-minute sunny pop song formula made it the 'straightest' record they ever made. Each of these four albums recorded with Lou Reed at the helm are considered to be classics of the time. Ironically, as rock music elsewhere moved from optimistic pop with catchy melodies in the mid-60s hippie heyday to a post-'Summer of Love' pessimistic reality check at the turn of the decade, the Velvet Underground had subverted the dominant trend by moving in the opposite direction.

After Reed left to pursue a successful solo career, Doug Yule continued under the original name and released Squeeze (1973). It was universally derided, and has been disowned by many Velvet Underground fans who insist it should be considered a middle-of-the-road Yule solo album. Squeeze is yet to be issued on CD. After its commercial and critical failure, Yule disbanded what was left of the group.

Content provided by SoundUnwound Copyright © 2008 IMDb.com, Inc. or its affiliates



:)
 

Astrid Kirchherr65

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Nah, the VU were around at least as early as 1966. They were an obvious huge influence on the Modern Lovers. You also have to remember the early punk scene in New York was broad enough to include acts like Patti Smith and Blondie.

True , everyone was attempting to put a label on the music then

I would consider Patti Smith and Blondie more punk than VU too

I dunno I love Lou Reed and I've seen the man in concert..he's pretty conservative now lol

but I do see that the influence was there...

what I was saying about THE GLAM scene was the period they were in the lower eastside , David Bowie, The Ny Dolls, Iggy, all that type of music was around..they were in the thick of it ...the way they dressed then was more in the genre of Glam then punk..

the punk rifts..the bouncey sound ..thats not what i feel when I listen to Velvet Underground music..it was much more sophisticated imo

This where I draw my info:


Published in time for the release of Todd Haynes' eagerly awaited film, Velvet Goldmine, Barney Hoskyns' GLAM! captures a thrilling, thoroughly over-the-top time in pop's life, an age of visual excess as rococo as it was space-age. From Oscar Wilde to Ziggy Stardust, from Liberace to Lou Reed and T Rex to Roxy Music, here is the flamboyant decadence, the androgyny, and the sheer unadulterated fun of the early Seventies -- in an incredible rock history that tells it like it was.
 

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rtbuck

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I'm definitely picking that book up(although right now I'm reading a great new Johnny Winter book!)!!! Thanks!
That's wild how that book was put out recently & so was the one I read on Bowie, Reed, & Iggy.
 

troggy

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what I was saying about THE GLAM scene was the period they were in the lower eastside , David Bowie, The Ny Dolls, Iggy, all that type of music was around..they were in the thick of it ...the way they dressed then was more in the genre of Glam then punk..

Sort of but they really pre-dated all of those guys. In fact, they were pretty much finished by the time the Dolls were around.
 

Astrid Kirchherr65

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Sort of but they really pre-dated all of those guys. In fact, they were pretty much finished by the time the Dolls were around.

Wait, are we talking Velvet Underground or Lou Reed being not in this scene ?


Maybe thats' the confusion ?
 

troggy

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I was talking the VU as a band. Lou Reed is something else altogether. You'd be correct, if that's what you meant.
 

Astrid Kirchherr65

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[COLOR=[quote="troggy, post: 149591"]I was talking the VU as a band. Lou Reed is something else altogether. You'd be correct, if that's what you meant.[/QUOTE]

Ahh , My bad lol...yes I guess it WAS Lou Reed solo at this point..I see what you mean....I think I was combining the two which IS completely different..sorry :bonk:

thats murkey territory ..that early 70's New York..I'm still weeding it out I guess

again , sorry !:grinthumb
 

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