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Pink Floyd (Official Thread)

Discussion in 'Progressive Rock' started by LG, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. architect

    architect Supine In The Sunshine

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    This is one of my favorite solos by David. :)

     
  2. Phil B.

    Phil B. Far Out Man!

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    Well, I think a lot of people don't realize how far we have come with life expectancy either. The chart below is just from 1960 until now. In the 1800's it was around 40 years old.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. CP/M User

    CP/M User Ace in the Hole

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    I'm sorry but I don't have time to go through 108 pages of PF talk, so can someone please put me out of my misery and tell me what the cover for the Meddle album is supposed to be? To me it looks like it's a side of a Nose upside down touching Water, but I guess someone has a better idea or knows what it is?
     
  4. Johnny-Too-Good

    Johnny-Too-Good Senior Member

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    It's an ear (under water). Not one of Storm Thorgerson's favourites.
     
  5. CP/M User

    CP/M User Ace in the Hole

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    I don't know why I didn't see it earlier, but since you mentioned it, it's quite clear. Guess I was paying too much attention to the Dark spots.
     
  6. Johnny-Too-Good

    Johnny-Too-Good Senior Member

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    From 'Ultimate Classic Rock' -

    Time has healed some of the wounds that tore Roger Waters apart from Pink Floyd, but that doesn’t mean he admits to any desire to set aside his solo career for some sort of reunion project.

    “A reunion is out of the question,” Waters told the Times. “Life, after all, gets shorter and shorter the closer you get to the end of it and time becomes more and more precious and, in my view, should be entirely devoted to doing the things you want to do. One can’t look backwards. Well one can — and I do, actually, and with some fondness — but to try and walk backwards would be absurd.”

    Waters and his former bandmate, Floyd drummer Nick Mason, were speaking with the paper on the occasion of a plaque being unveiled at Regent Street Polytechnic, the college where the band got its start in 1963. And although Waters was unequivocal in his disinterest, Mason spoke for a certain sector of Pink Floyd’s fan base when he made it clear he’ll never say never.

    “I live in hope,” said Mason, noting that some of the stumbling blocks include Waters being “difficult” and guitarist David Gilmour disliking touring. “If there’s another Live 8, maybe the others would step up for that. Or if some world leader said, ‘We need a bunch of artists to come and do a hundred gigs that might in some way change the face of the globe or help bring world peace,’ we might find we had a lot of fans in al-Qaeda.”

    Of course, any Floyd reunion would be incomplete without keyboard player Rick Wright, who died in 2008, or guitarist Syd Barrett, who lived in seclusion for years before passing away in 2006. Returning to the site where the band got its start prompted plenty of good-natured reminiscing from Mason and Waters, with Waters recalling he started writing songs after Barrett inspired him — and wrote one early composition, “Walk With Me Sydney,” with him in mind.

    “I’m afraid I can,” he laughed when asked whether he can remember how it went, and sings, “‘Waaalk with me, Sydney / I’d love to, love to, love to, baby you know / Sydney, it’s a daaark night, hold me, hold me, hold me tight / I’d love to, love to, love to / But I got flat feet and fallen arches and peritonitis and DTs and a washed-up braaaaain …’”

    After his impromptu a cappella performance Waters chuckled, “It was appalling. They don’t write songs like that anymore, son!”
     
  7. Johnny-Too-Good

    Johnny-Too-Good Senior Member

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    10 Years Since Live 8

    Roger Waters‘ relationship with David Gilmour was so distant in the period before Pink Floyd‘s celebrated reunion at Live 8 that Waters had to ask organizer Bob Geldof for his former bandmate’s phone number.

    While Geldof had been persistent in trying to broker peace between the pair, he’d hit an initial roadblock with Gilmour – who once referred to a possible detente as something akin to “sleeping with your ex-wife.” Waters then interceded. Ultimately, the event’s mission – Live 8 was meant to raise awareness of poverty, debt and the AIDS crisis in developing nations – led to one of music’s most improbable remarriages, though only for a single evening.

    “The moment was bigger than those bad feelings,” David Gilmour told the Associated Press in the days leading up to Pink Floyd’s June 2, 2005, appearance. “Any squabbles Roger and the band have had in the past are so petty in this context, and if reforming for this concert will help focus attention, then it’s going to be worthwhile.”

    And so Pink Floyd’s classic-era lineup – Gilmour, Nick Mason, Waters and Richard Wright – took the stage for the first time since a 1981 concert at Earl’s Court in London and, alas, for the last time ever.

    “It’s great to be asked to help Bob raise public awareness on the issues of third-world debt and poverty,” Waters enthused as the day drew near. “The cynics will scoff. Screw ‘em! Also, to be given the opportunity to put the band back together, even if it’s only for a few numbers, is a big bonus.”

    To no one’s surprise, Pink Floyd’s reunion eclipsed a star-packed lineup at the London Hyde Park show, which also included Paul McCartney, the Who, Elton John, Madonna, R.E.M., U2, Coldplay and Robbie Williams. Live 8, scheduled to sync up with the 20th anniversary of Live Aid, also featured six other events through July 6. Bon Jovi, Stevie Wonder, Dave Matthews, Jay-Z and others performed at Philadelphia. Brian Wilson, and Crosby Stills and Nash appeared in Berlin. Duran Duran and Tim McGraw were among the headliners in Rome. Annie Lennox performed at Edinburg as the G8 summit — a gathering of international leaders where debt cancellation and aid would be discussed — kicked off.

    For Pink Floyd, however, the most immediate concern was far more small scale: getting the songs right. “It’s sort of assumed that we’ll all remember how they go,” Mason impishly admitted.

    By all accounts, everyone was on their best behavior as three days of pre-show rehearsals unfolded. “There were times when Roger was struggling to not get bossy, and I was struggling to keep being bossy,” Gilmour said at the time. “I saw how arguments could have happened, but we aren’t at each other’s throats anymore. Getting rid of that acrimony has got to be a good thing. Who wants to have that fester in your mind the rest of your life?”

    Still, there was the matter of a set list. And it was there where the former bandmates – two decades after an ugly legal battle over the rights to the Pink Floyd name — once again clashed.

    Gilmour steadfastly refused to play Pink Floyd’s most recognizable radio hit, “Another Brick in the Wall,” deeming its anti-education message inappropriate for the moment. “Anyway, I don’t like it much. It’s all right but not part of the great emotional oeuvre,” Gilmour said, in a 2006 interview. “The songs that Roger wanted were not the ones I thought we should do. The arrangements of the songs were not the way Roger wanted to do them. But I kind of insisted.”

    In the end, Pink Floyd were restricted, like all of the other artists performing at Live 8, to a short, 20-minute set. Even a reunion 24 years in the making was only a mere portion of the larger production. So the band settled on four songs: “Breathe” and “Money” from 1973′s The Dark Side of the Moon, “Wish You Were Here” from the 1975 album of the same name and “Comfortably Numb” from 1979′s The Wall, Pink Floyd’s penultimate recording with Waters. They left aside music from the two Gilmour-led Pink Floyd albums that followed the acrimonious split.

    Waters made reference to the band’s original leader, the late Syd Barrett, even as he framed the larger reasons Pink Floyd had decided to reunite. “It’s actually quite emotional to be standing up here with these three guys again, after all these years – standing to be counted with the rest of you,” Waters said amid the opening strains of “Wish You Were Here.” “Anyway, we’re doing this for the people who’re not here – and particularly, of course, for Syd.”

    They finished with a somewhat awkward bow, but only after reaffirming Pink Floyd’s former power and grace (the stinging critique of greed found within “Money” held a new relevance in this modern context). After Pink Floyd’s catalog saw a stunning 1,300 percent sales increase after Live 8, Gilmour announced that he would donate the proceeds to charity.

    Beyond that, Gilmour said Live 8 gave his younger children an opportunity to see their semi-retired old man in a whole new light. “They now understand that I’m not just this bum who lazes around the house, cooks them supper and takes them to school,” Gilmour told Newsweek.

    He also had to deal with renewed questions about a larger-scale reunion with Waters. Pink Floyd’s core four were reportedly offered as much as $150 million for a U.S. tour. “It’s completely mad,” Gilmour said back then, “and we won’t do it. The idea for Live 8 was a one-off.”

    Waters appeared amenable, but ultimately turned his attention to what would become a blockbuster multi-year solo presentation of The Wall. “David is completely uninterested,” Waters told the Associated Press. “After Live 8, I could have probably gone for doing some more stuff, but he’s not interested.”

    Wright’s death on Sept. 15, 2008, seemed to put an end to any talk of such matters. Pink Floyd released a final album, 2014′s Endless River, built around older tracks featuring Wright, while Waters continued work on solo projects.

    “I think Live 8 was probably it,” Waters told the BBC. “And Live 8 was so beautiful, and Rick obviously was still with us then. If that’s the way we draw a line under Pink Floyd, so be it. I won’t be unhappy about that.”
     
  8. Johnny-Too-Good

    Johnny-Too-Good Senior Member

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    Pink Floyd - Comfortably Numb, Live 8

     
    nedkelly likes this.
  9. EJD1984

    EJD1984 Member

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    Roger Waters has made a few comments over the years that there is two songs on Momentary Lapse of Reason that he liked (musically).

    Does anyone know what two songs they might be?

    My personal guesstimate is Sorrow and Dogs of War.
     
  10. Jonny Come Lately

    Jonny Come Lately The New Kid In Town

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    I think I once read or heard that Roger quite liked Learning To Fly, although unfortunately I can't recall when or where I came across this.

    I must admit I am not a fan of Dogs Of War and I think this is partially because David was trying too hard to write a song in Roger's style - I prefer it when he is just himself, like on Poles Apart and High Hopes which I feel are very much his own thoughts on his own life, Syd and Roger.
     

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