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Blind Faith - Blind Faith (1969)

Discussion in 'Album Reviews' started by Vintage, Mar 5, 2010.

  1. Vintage

    Vintage Vintage Rocker

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    Blind Faith

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    In the late 60s, the term supergroup was hardly a part of the English lexicon. Some individuals used to think that Led Zeppelin and The Jeff Beck Group were supergroups, but these were bands that merely traded in on their lead guitarists’ reputations. To be a true supergroup, each member has to have some enduring legacy of his own. In 1969, the term was simply a tag line for something that didn’t exist until Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, Ginger Baker and Rick Grech teamed up to form Blind Faith. In retrospect, being a supergroup became more of a hindrance for Blind Faith than a godsend.

    Recorded under a shroud of secrecy and controversy, Blind Faith’s one and only eponymous album was mired by music business greed, ego and the transition of 60s idealism into 70s self-absorption. Clapton and Baker had already ridden the wild roller coaster of fame and notoriety with Cream, and were anxious to get back to the business of making valid and meaningful music. With his choirboy voice and songwriting prowess, Winwood bailed out of Traffic and was migrating back to his R & B roots while side tripping into loose jazz experimentations. For his part, Grech was just happy to be in the same room with these guys. The six songs -- Winwood’s "Had To Cry Today," "Can't Find My Way Home" and "Sea of Joy"; Clapton’s "Presence Of The Lord"; Baker’s "Do What You Like" and Buddy Holly’s "Well All Right" -- were all steadfast and true to the cause.

    The inflated hype guaranteed that Blind Faith would be a bona fide hit on both sides of the Atlantic. In America, the album received unsolicited attention for its cover –- a photograph of a topless, under-aged lass holding a model airplane –- which hardly thwarted its journey to the top of the charts (subsequent copies boasted a casual band photo). Regardless, mediocre and under rehearsed live performances in Europe and the States drove Clapton into the arms of Delaney and Bonnie while Winwood, Grech and Baker tried to extend the esteem by enlisting in Baker’s Air Force. Winwood eventually returned to the refuge of Traffic and Clapton formed Derek and The Dominoes –- the group that Clapton wished Blind Faith could have been. It’s only fitting that Blind Faith remains forever a symbol of its brief moment in the spotlight.
     
  2. Sox

    Sox Avoiding The Swan Song

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    Re: Blind Faith

    I was advised to get the Blind Faith album by the Head Gardener at Hardwick Hall, he was a real easy spirit and a student in the 60's. He said the record was fantastic and he was right. Great review Vintage.:grinthumb
     
  3. Sweaty

    Sweaty ThE OtHeR rAmOnE

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    Re: Blind Faith

    Can't find my way home wow....



    The DVD is great too

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  4. Džedaj

    Džedaj Groovy as hell.

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    Re: Blind Faith

    Great, great album. Combination of Winwoods jazzy-trippy composations, brilliant work on guitar from Slowhand, Ginger's cool drum fill-ins and background and last but not least solid groove from Ric make this album classic in music history.
     
  5. Craig in Indy

    Craig in Indy Your cool Uncle

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    Re: Blind Faith

    I had heard stories that the band's name was inspired by the record company's willingness to pay them all a boatload of money well before they ever heard any output from the group as a unit, all based solely on their respective musical pedigrees prior to coming together as a band. Any truth to that?
     
  6. Džedaj

    Džedaj Groovy as hell.

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    Re: Blind Faith

    Could be. I heard another story which tells how photographer look around for perfect girl to put on cover, and found one at subway. He asked her and she agreed, but later her sister pose for picture. The photographer called the picture "Blind Faith", because the space ship in her hands simbolized human creativity and intelligence, and young girl simbolized the carrier of new spore. When Clapton saw picture, he liked it so much he demand not to put band's name on cover and he named his band after the picture.
     
  7. Foxhound

    Foxhound retired

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    Re: Blind Faith

    And it was because of those two factors that Blind Faith ended up being more about Stevie than Eric or Ginger. Blind Faith sounded like Traffic. And that was also probably the underlying reason that Eric left for Delaney, Bonnie & Friends. That plus the very real possibility that he may have been screwing Bonnie....

    :D
     
  8. architect

    architect Supine In The Sunshine

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    Re: Blind Faith

    I love this album, especially Well Alright written by Buddy Holly
     

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