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"Kids are tired of buying air." - Alice Cooper

Discussion in 'Music News' started by That 70s Guy, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. That 70s Guy

    That 70s Guy Super Moderator Staff Member

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    blabbermouth.net

    [​IMG]

    Earlier this week, Ned of the WGRD 97.9 FM radio station in Grand Rapids, Michigan conducted an interview with MÖTLEY CRÜE drummer Tommy Lee and legendary rocker Alice Cooper. You can now listen to the chat below.

    Asked if he thinks any of the current crop of rock bands have the potential to leave a legacy that is comparable to those of MÖTLEY CRÜE and ALICE COOPER, Alice responded: "It's a different world [right now]. We were in a golden age of… where records… You'd go to a record store and buy records. And when you bought the records, you owned a piece of MÖTLEY CRÜE, you'd own a piece of ALICE COOPER. And you'd stand in line to buy that record. I think now, it's so disposable. Bands stay around for a year and a half, and you can't really dedicate your life to them, because you know they're not gonna be around next year. Whereas with MÖTLEY and ALICE, there's a security in that; there's a security that those bands are gonna be there for a long time."

    Cooper also spoke about the sudden resurgence of records over the past few years, which has resulted in a more-than-50-percent increase in sales over the between 2013 and 2014 alone.

    "Last year, vinyl went up 85 percent," Alice said. "And the kids, I think they're tired of buying air. They don't get anything with it. I think this generation is rebelling against the technology thing. I sign more records than I do CDs anymore."

    According to Nielsen Soundscan, more than 9.2 million vinyl records were sold in the U.S. last year, a 52 percent increase over 2013 figures. In the first quarter of this year, vinyl album sales were 53 percent higher than Q1 2014, driven by a 66 percent increase in catalog album sales (albums that have been released for at least 18 months) during the same period.

    Vinyl album sales have grown 260 percent since 2009.

    MÖTLEY CRÜE has announced 21 more North American dates. The new shows will take place in October and December as part of the band's two-year "The Final Tour" cycle. MÖTLEY CRÜE's touring career will conclude on New Year's Eve, December 31 at Staples Center in their hometown of Los Angeles where the band began 34 years ago. Audiences can also expect a high-energy performance from very special guest Alice Cooper, who joined the band for "The Final Tour" in 2014. He will be tearing up the stage for crowds in Australia/New Zealand and across North America once again on most 2015 dates. The pairing has been roundly praised as a must-see by fans and media alike.



    Read more at Alice Cooper On Vinyl Resurgence: Kids Are Tired Of Buying Air - Blabbermouth.net
     
  2. The Rover

    The Rover 'Ol Timer

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    The Classic Metal Show speaks about Vince Neil:





    Don't Shoot The Messenger :pullhair:
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2015
  3. The Wanderer

    The Wanderer Kids With Guns

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    While I do love my records I like to have a good collection of music available on my phone for the bus ride home or long trips out of state. Still I agree with what he says, the kids are tired of buying air.
     
  4. AboutAGirl

    AboutAGirl oh, be nice

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    My digital files will still be listenable when I'm 99 years old. They'll be as flawless then as they are today, there is zero wear and tear.

    When my computer breaks down, I can redownload every file I ever bought from iTunes. They don't charge me a cloud fee, they don't degrade or depreciate, the digital files that are already immortal with the proper precautions, are now immortal even without the proper precautions. I love to collect things, too. It's an awesome hobby, and that's what drove my years of CD collecting. But it's not worth paying more for an inferior product! That's pure lunacy. I'd rather have the music in pristine condition 'till the day I die, than an awesome shelf of albums. Paying for air? I'm paying for the music. The plastic is incidental.

    Most of my early CDs, and even some of my newer ones, they're all damaged and skip. If I could travel back in time I'd go back to the early 00s and tell myself not to be so stupid, collect on digital right from the start. Now I have to rebuy a lot of my favorite records because the digital files I've ripped are damaged since they came from a damaged source. That's money I could be using on a million other things, including new music I didn't already pay for.
     
  5. coltrane2

    coltrane2 Musicologist

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    I agree with all of this. I cherish all of my digital files as much as I did during the CD era. I buy vinyl too, but main collection is now digital. And the inferior sound thing is only true if you download crappy files then listen on poor equipment. Anything above 200kbps is picking up most of what is humanly audible.
     
  6. JimJam

    JimJam Senior Member

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    I have mixed feelings about Alice’s comments. No one is “buying air.” The digital files are the same music as on vinyl or CD and the content of the music is supposed to be what counts above all else. No one ever bought “a piece” of an artist when buying a vinyl record, not any more or less than when downloading digital.

    On the other hand, I know what he means about going to a record shop, browsing and picking out something to buy. It’s a fun and exciting experience and album artwork adds to the appeal, no question.

    I’m not convinced fans in the ‘70s knew he and others would be around for the “long haul.” Who thought about such things? All you knew was that, for the time being, most of your favorite artists would come out with a new album roughly once per year. - for as long as they might be around. By that time, a number of rockers were dead and bands had broken up. Not to mention the known habits of certain people such as Keith Richards and Ozzy; no one could have guessed they'd live long enough to see the '80s. Alice himself was known to be a very heavy drinker and was as likely to be found in a gutter half-dead in 1975 as to be alive in 2015.
     
  7. mrJim

    mrJim Senior Member

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    you don't own the files and cannot legally pass them on. heck if ITunes went out of business it's very possible you have no rights to them at all.

    they are not the same as vinyl or cd media, and as far as inferior product not all.

    I think there is a little wishful thinking in Alice Coopers comments. I don't believe there is that much thought going into it for young folks, heck it's probably older folks buying them. It's become a little bit of a "hip Thing" to listen to vinyl. Almost like having a silly looking beard.......... with a beard like that and those tattoos you must listen vinyl.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2015
  8. Riff Raff

    Riff Raff The Kevin Owens Show Staff Member

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    lol Digital files may not have wear and tear like physical media can but that's only if you can't look after your music copies.
     
  9. AboutAGirl

    AboutAGirl oh, be nice

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    Be that as it may, that's a pretty inconsequential point to make. I can't legally pass them on to anyone but I can pass them on to everyone I know at the click of a button, so what's the difference? I may not have legal rights to them but they couldn't take them away from me even if they wanted to, there's no way for me to lose these files. It's not like in the days when these kinds of sites had digital rights protection. That era is loooong gone. My digital files are literally a million times more versatile than any CD or vinyl. I can copy and disseminate this music into a dozen locations in minutes, iTunes can go out of business today and I'll still have all these files backed up a dozen times. In order to back up my CDs I first have to convert them to digital! That's pretty darn telling.

    How do you figure? Other than the collector aspect, in what sense are the physical copies as good or better than digital? If you lose a CD it's not like the company will send you a replacement. But if I lose my iPod or my computer crashes I already have these files backed up in several locations AND iTunes will even replace them for me at the touch of a button.

    Considering I was 11 years old when I got a lot of these CDs, yes I'd say I wasn't the best at taking care of my first 30 or so CDs. But also keep in mind that no one on Earth is infallible. Accidents do happen. CDs get damaged and CDs get lost, this is an unavoidable little foible of life. The physical versions can't be replaced without shelling out more cash, the digital versions are replaceable for free. Unless of course you convert your physical copies into digital first, the more versatile and finite medium.
     
  10. mrJim

    mrJim Senior Member

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    ^^ Vinyl from master is better than almost any digital file except the high res. In may cases Vinyl is being used to master those same high res files.

    So from a music/sound perspective vinyl is not an inferior product. and you can convert from Vinyl or CD to digital file. it's just fact.

    and there is not replacement for the portability and convenience of digit for which it superior. more fact

    Jim
     

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